Best Practices for Creating Flows

Keep it Simple

Each tooltip or action item should be concise and easily understandable. A flow should also be geared toward one goal, and you can link multiple flows together to create a series.

Example
Comparably allows users to choose a tutorial from a limited set of options, and then each tutorial is geared toward one feature.
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Keep it Short

Flows are best when they take no more than a minute or two to complete. For example, an onboarding tutorial should generally contain three to six steps.

Example
Amplitude's redesign tour allows users to opt-in and then quickly walks them through the new product features.
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Target Appropriately

New users probably don’t need to see feature announcements on their first day in your product, and a small change to your app probably doesn’t need a full screen modal. Think about who should be seeing the information and how.

Example
Zlien redesigned their product, but new users would never know there was an old product. Their announcement only displayed to users that had accounts prior to the redesign release date.
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Don’t Over'Flow' Your Users

You can overwhelm and frustrate users with too many flows at once. Create a cohesive strategy around when you’re going to show flows and how often. This is especially important if you have multiple people creating Flows for your product.

See the Targeting Settings overview

Drive Toward Value

Identify what users are trying to accomplish. Build flows that guide them toward those goals and increase the value of your product.

Example
Reddit knew their user base would quickly click through tooltips, without retaining the information. To solve this, they opted for one clear pop-up, in which they fit every new feature the user needs to know, while offering multiple exit routes.
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